Chanonry Point

Lighthouses on the East Coast of Scotland

In Salutem Omnium
For the Safety of All
Chanonry Point - Rosmarkie
Flag of Scotland
© Compiled by:
Bob Schrage
page updated: 14-01-2021
Buddon Ness High
Buddon Ness Low
Barns Ness
Bass Rock
Bell Rock Lighthouse
Buchan Ness
Chanonry
Clyth Ness
Covesea Skerry
Cromarty
Elie Ness
Fidra
Fife Ness
Gridle Ness
Inchkeith
Isle of May
Kinnaird Head
Noss Head
Oxcars
Rattray
Scurdie Ness
St Abbs Head
Tarbat Ness
Tod Head

The two lighthouses, Buddon Ness High and Buddon Ness Low, built in 1866 at the southern tip of the Barry Links, marking the entrance to the Firth of Tay. The nearest town is Carnoustie. The town was founded in the late 18th century, and grew rapidly throughout the 19th century due to the growth of the local textile industry. It was popular as a tourist resort from the early Victorian era up to the latter half of the 20th century, due to its seaside location, and is best known for the Carnoustie Golf Links course that often hosts the Open Championvessel. Carnoustie can be considered a dormitory town for its nearest city, Dundee, which is 18 km to the west. It is served by Carnoustie railway station, and less so by Golf Street railway station. Its nearest major road is the A92.

Two lights have been used here from as long ago as the 17th century. If the two lights lined up, the vessel knew that it was on the safe course. Unfortunately, due to the constant shift of the sandbanks, the lower light was eventually in the wrong position and had to move about 60 meters in 1884. The lighthouses are buildings of class B.

Buddon Ness lighthouse

Buddon Ness High Light (background) is one of two lighthouses built in 1866 at the southern tip of the Barry Links, marks the entrance to the Firth of Tay. The other (Buddon Ness Low) is approximately 800 meters to the east. The 'High Light' is a round, stone tower with lantern and gallery. It stands approximately 30 meters high. The remains of two lighthouses and associated structures are now used by the 'Army Cadet Training units' for summer camps. The Old High lighthouse on Buddon Ness was a high circular tower in painted stucco, built by the Stevensons in 1820.

The first lighthouse was established 1688.The two 'new' lighthouses are built in 1866 (David and Thomas Stevenson). Inactive since 1943. Approx. 27 meters round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. A radar beacon operated by Forth Ports is mounted on the tower. 2-story Victorian keeper's house. A circular storeroom attached to the keeper's house is probably the base of the second (1753) lighthouse. on the photo at right, Elliott Simpson has a 1986 photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. After deactivation the lighthouse serves for some years as an observation post, and several years after 1987 it carried a radar scanner as part of Dundee University research project. Located at the southern tip of the Barry Links. Site and tower are closed. Owner: Forth Ports PLC

Buddon Ness Low Light (foreground) is one of two lighthouses built in 1866 at the southern tip of the Barry Links, marking the entrance to the Firth of Tay. It stands approximately 800 meters to the east of Buddon Ness High Lighthouse. The 'Low Light' which is approximately 14 meters high, is a round, brick tower with lantern and gallery. Its position was moved by approximately 60 meters in 1884 a considerable feat of engineering at the time. The 'Low' lighthouse and Keeper's houses in Buddon Ness were built in the mid-19th century by the Stevenson Engineers. The cottages are now in a dangerous condition, unroofed with some walls collapsing and are fenced off to prevent public access.

The original (1688) lighthouse was replaced in 1753 by a wooden low light built on rollers for ease of relocation. In 1884 the current tower was also relocated, hauled by a steam engine over greased wooden rails a distance of 60 meters to the northeast. This engineering feat was remarkable for its time, is the earliest known instance of a masonry lighthouse being relocated in one piece. Today the Sands are marked only by a small beacon and buoys mark the channels offshore. After long used for military training is the area now closed to the public. An annual Nature/Open day is held every summer.

Description Dating from around 1820, Old Buddon Ness lighthouse is a circular lighthouse that is rendered and painted. It is attached to the northeast gable of a two-storey, four-bay lighthouse keeper's house. Originally 85 feet high, it is now truncated and is topped with a conical, tiled roof at roughly the same height as the adjoining keeper's accomodation. The lighthouse has three small window openings around the base. The lighthouse keeper's house has a gabled porch attached to the front elevation and an extension at the rear. Buddon Ness is at the southern tip of Barry Links at the northern entrance to the Firth of Tay, south of Carnoustie. Statement of Special Interest In 1865-66, two new lighthouses (high light and low light) were built at Buddon Ness by David and Thomas Stevenson for Trinity House of Dundee. These lights replaced the earlier lighthouse. The high light was constructed close by, to the northwest of the former lighthouse and keeper's cottage. The two lights are listed separately (LB4634 and LB4635). Statutory address revised and listed building record updated in 2020. Previously listed as 'Old Lighthouse, Budden Ness'. Records Ordnance Survey Name Books BUDDON NESS HIGH LIGHT (Stationary White) Buddon Ness High Light Buddon Ness High Light Buddon Ness High Light Admiralty Coast Chart 1835 Mr. Jack Harbour Master, Dundee James Martin, Lighthouse Keeper 055 [Situation] In the South end of Barry parish This lighthouse was erected about the year 1747, is 85 feet high, and painted white on the outside The light is a steady white one, and is put on each night from sun-set to sun-rise. It is lighted with three small lamps connected with three reflectors, each of the latter being 2 feet in diameter There is a good two storie house and a garden attached; the whole being the property of the Trinity Board at Dundee. A man named James Martin is in charge of this lighthouse, and has a salary of 60£ a year, and the free use of the house & garden. BUDDON NESS LOW LIGHT (Stationary White) Budden Ness Low Light Budden Ness Low Light Budden Ness Low Light Admiralty Coast Chart 1835 Mr. Jack Harbour Master Dundee William Graham Lighthouse Keeper 055 [Situation] In the South end of Barry parish Erected in 1813, is 65 feet high, and painted white on the outside. The light is a steady white one, and is put on each night from sun set to sun rise. It is lighted by two lamps in connection with two reflectors, each of the latter being 1 ft [foot] 10 in [inches] in diameter. There is a small house, one story high, and a garden attached: the whole the property of the Trinity Board at Dundee William Graham is the name of the man in charge. He has a salary of 40£ a year, and the free use of the house & garden.

AXXXX

Character: (discont.)

Engineers: David Lillie Stevenson (1815-1886)
: Thomas Stevenson (1818-1887)

Lat, Lon: 58°37.538' N, 04°59.952' W

Established: 1687 - Coal-fired tower
: 1753 - Stone tower att. to dwelling
: 1867 - Present tower
: 1884 - Low tower moved
Character: ???
Range: ???
Elevation...
Towers: 1 tower of 30 meters and
: 1 tower of 14 meters
Init. Costs: £ ?.
Econ. Costs*: £ ?.
*) According to: MeasuringWorth.com

Automated: Never
Last Keepers: ??? - PLK
: ??? - ALK
: ??? - ALK
Fog horn: No

Status: Discontinued 1943
: Current use: Radar Beacon
Authority: Forth Ports PLC
Remarks:
Old house: Cat.C listed - LB4633 - 15/01/1980
High tower: Cat.B listed - LB4634 - 11/06/1971
Low tower: Cat.B listed - LB4635 - 11/06/1971

Buddon Ness lighthouse
Buddon Ness lighthouse
Buddon Ness map
Buddon Ness map

Buddon Ness lighthouse
References:
Buddon Ness footage- Youtube Rockwellmedia(c)