Point of Ayre
Point of Ayre lighthouse
photo: © Marinas.com

Isle of Man

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Update: 28-03-2024

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Calf of Man - New
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Point of Ayre

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Point of Ayre Lighthouse

Lighthouse shield

http://www.lightkeepersjourney.com/

FL (4) W 20 seconds. (fl 0.2,ec 2.3,fl 0.2,ec 2.3,fl 0.2,ec 2.3,fl 0.2,ec 12.3) Light Range 21 miles Optic Height 32 metres Tower Height 30 metres First order Dioptric Equalising (Fresnel) Lens Point of Ayre Lighthouse Station Isle of Man 2005 Point of Ayre Station (2005) Point of Ayre Tower 2002Light first shown 1st.November 1818 Established 1st.February 1819 The light was not allowed to be established and charge light duties until the Calf of Man lights were completed. A revolving catoptric light,consisting of fourteen (2 ft. diameter) parabolic reflectors with Argand lamps. It revolved every two minutes, showing one minute a white light, and the other minute a red light. 1890 Station Refurbishment Lantern and Optic equipment replaced 2nd February 1891 First order Dioptric Equalising Light revolving every eight minutes,shown as a Red and White Flash alternating every thirty seconds One lamp five concentric wicks 4.5" diameter Required rewinding every ninety minutes. Tower two red bands painted Minor Light (Winkie) built. Single Fog Siren installed Three 5hp Priestman oil engines installed - ran on paraffin c1939 Fog signal engines and compressors replaced by three cylinder Kelvin diesel engines and Sentinel compressors. Second Fog siren added. Character (3) 90 sec 1950 Minor light moved 250 feet seaward. 1960 Mains water and electric supply arrived at station. 1978 Chance Brothers 55mm Paraffin Vapour Lamp replaced with 250 watt Mercury Vapour Lamp Clockwork drive retained c1981 Storm signal discontinued 1985 Radio Beacon aerial mast replaced by di-pole aerial 1991 Tempory Power Beam light whilst main lens bearing changed from chariot wheel to modern bearing Character changed to Group Flash (4) 20 sec. Main light back in use 18/12/91 Lamp changed to 400 watt Metal Halide. Lampchanger NALC-89 8/7/1992 Fog siren replaced by Electric Emitter Character changed to (3) 60 sec 16/8/2005 Fog signal discontinued 31/3/92 Radio Beacon discontinued 31/03/1993 Station automation completed with a similar system to Maughold Head. Main differences a 400 watt lamp instead of 250 watt. Eventually three phase motors instead of single phase. Gave a more gradual power take up and saved wear on gearbox clutches 2
Lighthouse keepers of Point of Ayre
Names with brackets (Year) indicates keeper was there - no other information available
R/ALK When automation was aproaching there were no more Supernumary keepers, so some keepers were assigned to a Relieving complement to fill in for keepers being transferred ,sick etc.

YearFrom StationKeeper NameTo StationYear

A. Blyth (PLK) (1888)
W. Wallace (1888)
T.A. Christian (1888)
A. Saunderson (1890)
A. Quine (1890)
W. Charleson (1897)
1890Langness A. McQuarrie
1891 W.J. Dawson Mull of Kintyre1899
Fidra J. Henderson Corsewall 1899
E. Alderbert Langness 1902
1904Scurdie Ness R.H. McColm Skerryvore 1908
1904 D.T. Gutcher 1911
1906Girdle Ness W. Crowe Muckle Flugga 1909
1909 D. MacKenzie Chicken Rock 1918
A. Burnett (PLK) Neist Point 1914
1914 A. McEachern (PLK)
1914Pladda D. Campbell
1918Maughold H. Laidlaw
1920Covesea Skerry T.S. Campbell Deceased 1926
1921Sanda J. Henderson Retired 1929
1929Copinsay A. Mc Graw
1930Kinnaird Head A. McCauley
A. McGan (PLK) Ailsa Craig 1931
1931 A. McCrea
J. Milne
G. Combe
1936 R. Park Chicken Rock 1943
A. McMillan (1940)
1943Chicken Rock T. Shaw
1945 E.A. Black Barns Ness 1952
A. Ross (1952)
Megaw (1955)
1952Isle of May E. Carine Corsewall 1958
1953 R.G. Crowe Stroma 1959
1958Isle of Arron G.B. Barbour
1959Stroma R. Thomson Tod Head 1960
1960Tod Head D. White
T.T. Russel Dunnet Head 1975
1975Rattray Head J.W.A. Corse Copinsay 1978
N. Cragie Copinsay 1975
1976SLK (?) R.S. Morrow Ailsa Craig 1981
L. Hendry Cape Wrath 1976
1978Duncansby Head W. Meil Retired 1983
E.J. England Sanda 1978
1978Rattray Head D. Fox Maughold Head 1982
1981Davaar I.H. MacKay St Abbs Head 1985
1982Hyskier A.D. MacLaren Maughold Head 1987
1984Fair Isle A. Hutchison Calf of Man 1987
1985R/ALK J.F. Crowe St Abbs Head 1989
1987Calf of Man R. Gatt Retired 1989
1987R/ALK G. Adamson Calf of Man 1993
1989Sumburgh Head G. Dugdale Langness 1993
1989Hyskier J. Kermode Rinns of Islay 1993

Local ALK
1974 D.J. Ogden Retired 1983
1983 D. Livesay Resigned 1984
1984Maughold Head D. Fox Redundant 1984

Attendant
1993 D. Fox Redundant 2004

Retained lighthouse Keeper
2004 D. Fox

Point of Ayre (Low) usually known as "Winkie"

2003 Videograph fog detector(Back scatter) replaced by Visibility sensor VF-500-110T (forward scatter) 2005 Fog signal discontinued 13:15 hrs August 16th Before automation at the Point of Ayre lighthouse it used to be a leisurely Red and White beam every minute,this used to pass across one of the local farmers barns where he kept his cows overnight-No problem. When the light was automated the lamp was changed from 250 watt to 400 watt and character changed to four quick flashes every 20 seconds,after a few nights the farmer was complaining that his cows were fretful and restless and the only thing he could think of,was the light beams,so we extended the blank panes (Without compromising safety) and the cows settled down again. Point of Ayre Lens 2005 Point of Ayre lens (2005) Point of Ayre Lamps 2003An unusual view showing main and reserve lamps along with photo-electric cells which are used to monitor that the light is on,used in conjunction with monitoring of lamp current consumption. Point of Ayre Lamps-2 2003 Operation of the light is monitored at Northern Lighthouse Board Monitoring Center. Attendant visits on a fortnightly basis carry's out system checks and checks physical condition of building. September 2004 the Retained Lighthouse Keeper (Isle of Man) superceded the Attendant and visits on a monthly basis. Technicians visit at least annually to check,modify and update equipment as required. Point of Ayre Equipment 2004 (2005)__________________________Racon_____Visibility Sensor___ Standby Light____________________________Fog Signal_____Standby Light Copy of original plaque Copy of original 1890 brass plaque Removed during automation program 1993 Character FL 3 sec......(fl 0.3 ec 2.7) Light discontinued 7th April 2010 Point of Ayre(Low) pre-1939 Point of Ayre(Low) Pre-1939 (Copyright--Unknown) Light (Fixed white) first exhibited 1890 Point of Ayre(Low) 1990 Point of Ayre(Low) 2015 __________________________________________________________________Copyright Kota _____________________Point of Ayre (Low) 1990_________________________Point of Ayre (Low) 2015 showing plaque Point of Ayre(Low) plaque Winkie plaque removed October 2015 Point of Ayre (Low) Scenic 2002 Point of Ayre 2002 ----- Point of Ayre(Low) ------------------------Old Fog Signal --------Point of Ayre Moved to present location in 1950 AGA Lamp Flasher 1992 Originally 2 superimposed dioptric fifth order fixed lens with argand burners Probably 1950 when changed to Fifth Order fixed lens with an AGA Flasher using Acetylene Gas. Which meant an evening walk to raise the blinds,turn on the gas and light the pilot light. Then a morning walk to turn off the gas and lower the blinds Gas Bottles and Gauge 1992 After the annual storing trip there would be 9 cylinders of gas. 3--in use----- 3--on standby 3--in reserve ML300 Lantern 2005---- Bi-filament Lamp 2002 Tideland ML300 Lantern (2005)------------60 watt Bi-filament lamp (2002) Automation in 1993 introduced a Tideline ML300 Lantern running a 60 watt Bi-filament lamp. Operation of the light is monitored at Northern Lighthouse Board Monitoring Center. Attendant visits on a fortnightly basis and checks physical condition of building and that the No.1 filament is in use. September 2004 the Retained Lighthouse Keeper (Isle of Man) superceded the Attendant and visits on a monthly basis. Technicians visit at least annually to check,modify and update equipment as required. All photographs Copyright Fred Fox unless otherwise shown.

Place of the lighthouse

Building of the Lighthouse

Warning systems (Light, Fog horn, Radar Beacon)

1818 14 x 2 foot Parabolic reflectors FL ALT W/R 60sec 1890 1st order lens five wick lamp FL ALT W/R 30sec Rewind every 90 minutes 16 Bullseye lens. Alternate lens with red glass shades Upper and lower catoptric lens to increase strength of red sectors. C1910 PV burner 1978 250 watt Mercury vapour lamp 1992 400 watt Mercury vapour lamp FL (4) 20 sec First order dioptric equalising light shown as a red and white flash alternating every thirty seconds Designed by Messrs Stevenson,Civil Engineers,Edinburgh Constructed by Messrs Barbier and Bernard,Paris and Messrs James Dove & Coy,Edinburgh David A Stevenson Engineer to the Board Apparatus makes one revolution every eight minutes 1991 Character changed from ALT.W.R.60 sec to FL(4)20 sec when tempory Power Beam Beacon used during refurbishment. Lens dismantled to change chariot wheel bearing to modern bearing. 1989 New Amplidan Radio Beacon installed 1992 1st July Radio Beacon discontinued 169,000cd 21 Nautical Miles Trinity House report 68/AC/IT/RV/1992

Operational status

Information about the lighthouse specific

Additional information

associated engineer Robert Stevenson David Alan Stevenson date 1816 - 1st February 1819, 1890 - 1891 era Georgian | category Lighthouse | reference NX464048 ICE reference number HEW 936 photo Paul Dunkerley The upper light on Point of Ayre at the north-east corner of the Isle of Man was designed by Robert Stevenson, patriarch of the famous family of lighthouse engineers. It was refurbished at the end of the nineteenth century by his grandson, David Alan Stevenson. The lighthouse was built for the Commisioners of Northern Lighthouses (Northern Lighthouse Board), based in Edinburgh. They were first empowered to erect lighthouses on the Isle of Man by an Act of Parliament of 1815. Robert Stevenson's light later became the upper lighthouse of the onshore pair on Point of Ayre. The lower light is by David Alan Stevenson and was constructed in 1890-91, when he was also refurbishing his grandfather's lighthouse. There is also a fog signal station on the point. Stevenson visited the construction site on 12th August 1818 while on the third of his ‘lighthouse tours’. He gave a month's notice to the Inspector as he was not satisfied with the quality of the workmanvessel of the labour force. The tower was recorded as being 84ft (25.6m) high in 1851. It is thought that the lamp — argand with 610mm refelectors — was first lit on 1st February 1819. Refurbishment work, including some rebuilding of the tower and replacement of the lamp, was carried out by David Alan Stevenson in 1890-91. At least one construction drawing was known in the 1970s to have survived. It was signed Charles Stevenson pro D.A. Stevenson. The light was replaced with one made by Barbier of Paris and James Dove of Edinburgh. It was a first order catadioptric paraffin vapour light of 66,000 candlepower with a range of 30km. It flashed alternately white and red every 60 seconds. The tower was rebuilt to a height of 30.18m, making the light 32.3m above mean high water level. Inside the tower, a spiral stone staircase of 107 steps leads up to a landing from which a wooden spiral ladder with 17 rungs provides access to the lantern room. An iron balcony runs around the walkway outside. The present-day lamp is a 250 watt mercury vapour. It works off mains power or standby generators and has a nominal range of 30.5km, though can sometimes be seen from further away. The lamp mechanism goes through one revolution every 8 minutes. These days, the seven storey tower is painted in alternate stripes of white and fluorescent red. There is an information plaque in the lantern room. A walled enclosure at the base of the tower contains the origianl lighthouse keepers’ houses, gardens, and a generator house. The lighthouse was automated in 1993 and continues to be operated by the Northern Lighthouse Board. Point of Ayre Upper Lighthouse is the oldest lighthouse on the Isle of Man. Robert Stevenson also designed the twin lights on the Calf of Man off at the south-west corner of the island. associated engineer David Alan Stevenson date 1890 - 1891 era Victorian | category Lighthouse | reference NX467050 ICE reference number HEW 936 photo Paul Dunkerley The lower light on Point of Ayre is one of pair of lighthouses at the north-east corner of the Isle of Man. Both were designed by members of the famous Stevenson family of lighthouse engineers. The lower light was designed by David Alan Stevenson, grandson of the family patriarch, Robert Stevenson. The lighthouse was commissioned by the Northern Lighthouse Board, as the earlier one had been before it. This earlier one (the Upper Lighthouse) started operating in 1819 and was designed by Robert Stevenson. It is the oldest lighthouse on the Isle of Man. David Alan Stevenson worked on the refurbishment of it at the time of the building of the Lower Light, 1890-91. The second lighthouse stands on the shingle foreshore on an octagonal podium, 2.9m across with sides each measuring 1.2m. The podium now sits on Larsen steel piles that stick up 1.2m above the level of the shingle. The piling was added in 1950, when the lighthouse was rebuilt. The lamp produces white light, flashing every 3 seconds, and its range is some 13km. Near the lower light is a fog signal station, now out of use. associated engineer Not known Fog Horn date 1906 era Modern | category Lighthouse | reference NX466049 ICE reference number HEW 936 photo Paul Dunkeley Sitting between the Upper Lighthouse and the Lower Lighthouse on the Point of Ayre at the north-east corner of the Isle of Man, is an early twentieth century fog signal station, now disused. The signal station was erected by order of a Committee of Tynwald — the Isle of Man parliament. It consists of a three storey concrete tower with two air-operated sirens. These produced three low-pitched blasts of sound every 90 seconds as a fog warning. The air compressor stands on the ground beside the tower. The two nearby onshore lights are associated with the Stevenson family of lighthouse engineers. The upper one (1819) is by Robert Stevenson and the lower (1891) is by his grandson, David Alan Stevenson. Both were commisisoned by the Northern Lighthouse Board, the upper being the oldest lighthouse on the isle of Man. The Point of Ayre Lighthouse is an active 19th century lighthouse, sited at the Point of Ayre at the north-eastern end of the Isle of Man. It was designed and built by Robert Stevenson, grandfather of prolific writer and novelist Robert Louis Stevenson, and was first lit in 1818, making it the oldest operational lighthouse on the island. The lighthouse still retains its original 1st order Fresnel lens from 1890, which was supplied by Barbier, Benard, et Turenne of Paris. With a focal height or elevation of 32 meters (105 ft) above sea level, the light from the 30 meters (98 ft) tower has a nominal range of around 19 nautical miles (35 km). Its light characteristic is made up of a pattern of four flashes of white light every twenty seconds. The tower has a distinctive daymark of two red bands, the light can be seen clearly from across the water in south-west Scotland.[1] Owing to the continuous accumulation of shingle and gravel deposited by the strong currents, a smaller light commonly referred to as a 'winkie' had to be built 750 feet (230 m) to the seaward side of the main tower in 1899. This was then repositioned a further 250 feet (76 m) in the same direction and for the same reasons in 1950. The 'winkie' light was discontinued on 7 April 2010.[1][2] The lighthouse buildings and land have been in private ownervessel since 1993 when the light was fully automated. The light continues to be maintained by the Northern Lighthouse Board based in Edinburgh. In August, 2005, the fog signal at the lighthouse was de-commissioned owing to the assumed reliance and availability of GPS and modern vesselping guidance systems.[2]

At a meeting of the Commissioners in 1815, Sheriff Rae pointed out that representations had been received from the Chief Magistrate of Greenock and from various trading bodies in the Firth of Clyde, that a light should be erected on the Point of Ayre to make the west coast channel completely safe. As this area was out of the Commissioners' jurisdiction in those days, it was suggested the 'Sheriff Rae should write to the Duke of Atholl and ascertain if he had any objections to the establishment. The Light Committee then recommended that the Commissioners should apply to Parliament for power to erect a lighthouse on the Isle of Man. The Bill was passed in July 1815. Soon thereafter, a party representing the Commissioners went to Liverpool to attempt to obtain a loan from the trade associations. The loan was necessary as the Commissioners had become liable for a large sum to liquidate the payment of the purchase money of the private right of the Portland family to the duties of the Light of May. They were also involved in the building of the Bell Rock Lighthouse.

Loans amounting to £1,500 were obtained from the West India Association, and the vesselowners Association of Liverpool. Further loans were obtained from the Trade Association of the Clyde who would also benefit from the establishment of the light. The work commenced late in 1815, but lack of sufficient funds made progress slow. A further cause for delay was that the position of the light had to be altered from the original plan as it was found that the sea was eroding the coast at the rate of 7ft per year.

The lighthouse tower was 70ft high and a circular design. The actual date when the light was first exhibited cannot be accurately fixed, but it is known to have been between December 1818 and February 1819.

Some 70 years later it was found necessary to build an additional small light tower some 250 yards seaward from the main tower. Due to continuous gravel build-up, this tower moved a further 250ft seaward in 1951, and now stands out on the gravel bank. This small light was known as The Winkie.

Point of Ayre was lighted by the dioptric (refraction) method. The light revolved on roller bearings driven by a clock-work mechanism operated by a weight lowered to the base of the tower. In all but the most sophisticated lighthouse, this had to be rewound manually, the diuturnity governed by the revolution of the optic and the height of the tower. This varies from 45 minutes at Maughold Head, 77 ft high and turning every 30 seconds, to 90 minutes at the Point of Ayre which had an eight minute revolution.

In favourable wind conditions, the fog horn could be heard at the Mull of Galloway, 26 miles away. Powered by Kelvin engines, the siren used an intermittent escape of compressed air through a shutter to give a periodic blast from the large horns facing seawards.

Thirteen selected lighthouses sent regular reports to the Meteorological Office as many of the stations were vanguards to the Atlantic weather system. Point of Ayre submitted three hourly reports to the Met Office at Ronaldsway, and these were incorporated in the international broadcasts.

The name Point of Ayre comes from Norse, Eyrr, gravelly beach, or Eriball, and Ayre Point of Raasay.

In 2010, the three General Lighthouse Authorities (GLAs) of the UK and Ireland issued a consultation document following a joint review of Aids to Navigation of the coasts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. The Review addressed the current and future requirements of national and international vesselping and those of Mariners. Each Aid to Navigation - light, buoy or beacon - was studied in isolation, as well as in relation to the other Aids to Navigation in its vicinity. As a result of this review it was agreed to discontinue the minor light at the Point of Ayre, known as The Winkie. This light was therefore permanently discontinued with effect from 7 April 2010.

The Point of Ayre lighthouse is an active 19th century lighthouse, sited at the Point of Ayre at the north-eastern end of the Isle of Man. It was designed and built by Robert Stevenson, grandfather of prolific writer and novelist Robert Louis Stevenson, and was first lit in 1818, making it the oldest operational lighthouse on the island.

The lighthouse still retains its original 1st order Fresnel lens from 1890, which was supplied by Barbier, Benard, et Turenne of Paris. With a focal height or elevation of 32 meters (105 ft) above sea level, the light from the 30 meters (98 ft) tower has a nominal range of around 19 nautical miles (35 km). Its light characteristic is made up of a pattern of four flashes of white light every twenty seconds. The tower has a distinctive daymark of two red bands, the light can be seen clearly from across the water in south-west Scotland.

Owing to the continuous accumulation of shingle and gravel deposited by the strong currents, a smaller light commonly referred to as a 'winkie' had to be built 750 feet (230 m) to the seaward side of the main tower in 1899. This was then repositioned a further 250 feet (76 m) in the same direction and for the same reasons in 1950. The 'winkie' light was discontinued on 7 April 2010.

The lighthouse buildings and land have been in private ownervessel since 1993 when the light was fully automated. The light continues to be maintained by the Northern Lighthouse Board based in Edinburgh. In August, 2005, the fog signal at the lighthouse was de-commissioned owing to the assumed reliance and availability of GPS and modern vesselping guidance systems.

Foghorn History The foghorn building dates from 1899. The building has been the subject of alterations to the form of its upper section since first constructed. Photographic evidence shows the building has been in its current form since at least the 1940s. The fog signal was decommissioned in 2005. Details MATERIALS: A mixture of painted sand/cement render and painted concrete. The signal amplifiers are painted metal. PLAN: Hexagonal column at ground level with a plinth at its base; a cone shaped mounting at its head. EXTERIOR: The building has a plain, white painted exterior. The top of the building houses two red painted metal fog horn amplifiers pointing broadly north and south-east respectively. Winkie Lighthouse History 1950 5th order lens AGA acetylene flasher 1993 Tideline ML300 Lantern Moved to present position in 1950 was originally sited in front of fog horn Built in the 1890, the lighthouse, 10 meter high, was constructed to the seaward side of the main (Robert Stephenson designed) lighthouse as a further maritime warning measure given the accumulation of shingle and gravel since the main lighthouse had been completed in 1818. In 1950, the lighthouse was repositioned further in a seaward, North-Easterly direction, with the historic section raised and mounted on a concrete lower section and base. The light signal was discontinued in April 7, 2010. Details MATERIALS: Concrete base with permanent metal shuttering. Painted concrete tower, with metal lantern section and balcony. Glazing to lantern room. PLAN: The property is octagonal, set on a square shuttered concrete base. The structure tapers towards its head. EXTERIOR: A concrete base with permanent shuttering raises the structure above the beach level. The lower half of the tower is plain in form, with a maintenance access door on its landward face. The upper section sits inboard of the lower section, with a balcony/walkway surround to the lantern room. The balcony-like structure between the upper and lower sections is the original base of the lighthouse prior to its repositioning and raising in 1950. The lantern room glazing is formed of triangular panes inverted alternately. INTERIOR: Three levels, with painted metal ladders providing circulation between each level. Ground and first floor level have white painted vertical timber boarding, with circular metal windows housed within square openings. The lantern room (second floor) has no lighting equipment, having been removed when the light was decommissioned. A small metal door gives access to the external balcony. Character Fl. 3sec.
NLB Point Of Ayre Point of Ayre Lighthouse was established in 1818 and engineered by Robert Stevenson. History At a meeting of the Commissioners of Northern Lighthouses in 1815, Sheriff Rae pointed out that representations had been received from the Chief Magistrate of Greenock and from various trading bodies in the Firth of Clyde, that a light should be erected on the Point of Ayre to make the west coast channel completely safe. As this area, that in those days, was out of the Commissioners’ jurisdiction, it was suggested that Sheriff Rae should write to the Duke of Atholl and find out if he had any objections to the establishment. The Light Committee then recommended that the Commissioners should apply to Parliament for power to erect a lighthouse on the Isle of Man. The Bill was passed in July 1815. Soon after, a party representing the Commissioners went to Liverpool to attempt to obtain a loan from the trade associations. The loan was necessary as the Commissioners had become liable for a large sum to liquidate the payment of the purchase money of the private right of the Portland family to the duties of the Light of May. They were also involved in the building of the Bell Rock Lighthouse. Loans amounting to £1,500 were obtained from the West India Association, and the Shipowners Association of Liverpool. Further loans were obtained from the Trade Association of the Clyde who would also benefit from the establishment of the light. The work commenced late in 1815, but lack of sufficient funds made progress slow. A further cause for delay was that the position of the light had to be altered from the original plan as it was found that the sea was eroding the coast at the rate of 7ft per year. The lighthouse tower was 70ft high and a circular design. The actual date when the light was first exhibited cannot be accurately fixed, but it is known to have been between December 1818 and February 1819. Around 70 years later an additional small tower was built 250 yards seaward from the main tower. Due to continuous gravel build-up, this tower moved a further 250 feet seaward in 1951, and now stands out on the gravel bank. This small light is known as The Winkie. Point of Ayre was lit by the dioptric (refraction) method. The light revolved on roller bearings driven by a clock-work mechanism operated by a weight lowered to the base of the tower. In all but the most sophisticated lighthouse, this had to be rewound manually, the diuturnity governed by the revolution of the optic and the height of the tower. This varies from 45 minutes at Maughold Head, 77 ft high and turning every 30 seconds, to 90 minutes at the Point of Ayre which had an eight minute revolution. In favourable wind conditions, the fog horn could be heard at the Mull of Galloway, 26 miles away. Powered by Kelvin engines, the siren used an intermittent escape of compressed air through a shutter to give a periodic blast from the large horns facing seawards. Thirteen selected lighthouses sent regular reports to the Meteorological Office as many of the stations were vanguards to the Atlantic weather system. Point of Ayre submitted three hourly reports to the Met Office at Ronaldsway, and these were incorporated in the international broadcasts. The name Point of Ayre comes from Norse, Eyrr, gravelly beach, or Eriball, and Ayre Point of Raasay. Point of Ayre lighthouse was automated in 1993. In 2010, the three General Lighthouse Authorities (GLAs) of the UK and Ireland issued a consultation document following a joint review of Aids to Navigation of the coasts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. The Review addressed the current and future requirements of national and international shipping and those of Mariners. Each Aid to Navigation – light, buoy or beacon – was studied in isolation, as well as in relation to the other Aids to Navigation in its vicinity. As a result of this review it was agreed to discontinue the minor light at the Point of Ayre, known as The Winkie. This light was therefore permanently discontinued with effect from 7 April 2010. At some sites the Northern Lighthouse Board has sold redundant buildings within the lighthouse complex and are not responsible for the maintenance of these buildings.

Point of Ayre


A4720 (High) / A4722 (Low)

Character: Fl(4) W 20s 32m 19M
(3x fl. 0.2s - ec. 2.3s, fl. 0.2s - ec. 12.3s)

Point of Ayre lighthouse
Lightcharacter of Point of Ayre (click to enlarge the map)
Engineer: Robert Stevenson (1752-1850)

Lat, Lon: 54°24.940' N, 004°22.090' W

Established: Febraury 1, 1818
Character: Flashing(4) White every 20 sec.
Range: 19 NM ~ 35.2 km
Elevation: 32 meters above sealevel
Tower: 30 meters, 124 steps to the top
Init. Costs: £ 18,846 6s 3d
Econ. Costs*: £ 95,040,000 (2021)
*) According to: MeasuringWorth.com

Automated: March 31, 1993
Last Keepers: PLK - J. Kermode
: ALK - G. Adamson
: ALK - G. Dugdale
Fog Signal: 2x ELG 300 Electric
: 3 blasts every 60 s.
: Discontinued August 17, 2005
Racon: M(- -) 13M

Status: Operationel
Authority: Northern Lighthouse Board
Remarks: PBR147 - 05/11/1993 Lighthouse
: PBR297 - 07/07/2021 Foghorn
: PBR298 - 07/07/2021 Winkie LH

Point of Ayre Lighthouse
Point of Ayre

Point of Ayre Lighthouse
Point of Ayre, Foghorn and Point of Ayre (Low)
also know as "Winkie"

Point of Ayre Lighthouse
The foghorn on early times (single horn) with the low lighthouse (Winkie)
References:
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