Langness
Langness lighthouse
photos: © Peter Killey

Isle of Man

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Update: 10-03-2024

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Langness
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The Herring Tower PRB141 01/08/1991 The Herring Tower is situated on the Langness Peninsula in the south of the Isle of Man. It was built by Thomas Brine in 1823.[1][2] The tower was built as a daymark[1] and was based on the style of the tower of Peel Castle.[3] Since 1991 the Herring Tower has been protected as a registered building.[4]

Place of the lighthouse

Building of the Lighthouse

Warning systems (Light, Fog horn, Radar Beacon)

Lighthouse keepers of Langness
Names with brackets (Year) indicates keeper was there - no other information available
R/ALK When automation was aproaching there were no more Supernumary keepers, so some keepers were assigned to a Relieving complement to fill in for keepers being transferred ,sick etc.

YearFrom StationKeeper NameTo StationYear

A. Ferrier Little Ross 1884
1884Isle of May R. Clyne Rattray Head 1895
1895 J. Ducat Flannan Isles
W. Gawne (1895)
W.R. Saunderson (1892)
Oxcar A. McQuarrie Point of Ayre 1901
A. Sanderson (1892)
A. Withers (1894)
1901Chanonry A. Burnett
1897 J. Simpson Skerryvore 1901
1900 A. Ingram Point of Ayre 1902
1902Point of Ayre E. Alderbert
1912 G. MacDonald Girdle Ness 1920
T. Middleton Butt of Lewis 1920
1912 J.W. Dishon Stoer Head 1923
1923Inchcape J.C. McCulloch
M. Cunningham Fair Isle 1925
1920Lismore A. Sim Barns Ness 1927
1925 W. Wards
1928Scurdie Ness D.T. Gutcher Deceased 1928
W. Johnstone
1928 G. Laurenson Douglas Head 1931
1928Cape Wrath G. Millerjura 1932
1931Tod Head G.B. Summers
1932Douglas Head A. McDonald
1930 R. Gilmore Barra Head 1937
1937Barra Head J.A. Mcleod Dubh Artach 1945
G. MacKenzie Chicken Rock 1938
W. Quillin (1941)
A. Crawford(1938)
1945Orkneys C. Roberts Chicken Rock 1948
W. Christie (1950)
E. Stewert Turnberry 1958
G. Gilbertson Rubna nan Gall 1955
A. Chisholm (1950)
1955Maughold Head R. Crowe
C. Crowe Skerryvore 1958
1958 A. McLardy
Chicken Rock A. Salthouse Deceased 1967
1974Ailsa Craig W.R. Ritchie Barns Ness 1977
R. Shand Calf of Man 1974
J.H. Stevenson Pentland Skerries1975
1975Sanda Island T.P. Budge Muckle Flugga 1976
A.C. Gunn Bass Rock 1975
1975Rinns of Islay T. Kermode Sule Skerry 1978
1976Fair Isle SouthJ. Paisley Inchkeith 1978
1977Turnberry A.J.W. Combe Retired 1979
1978Strathy Point A. Young Skerryvore 1983
1978Copinsay N.S. Cargill Calf of Man 1979
1979Calf of Man R. Shand Retired 1983
1979Covesea Skerry R.J. Daggert Fair Isle 1984
1983Sule Skerry A. McDonald Bell Rock 1986
1983Bell Rock J. Burns Skerryvore 1987
1984Inchkeith D. Morrison Cape Wrath 1988
1986Calf of Man D. Grassom Duncansby Head 1993
1987Stroma E.J. Stewart Redundant 1991
1988Sumburgh Head A.C. Gunn Retired 1989
1989R/ALK A. Marshall Redundant 1996
1991Calf of Man M.R. Williams 1996
1993Point of Ayre G. Dugdale Redundant 1996

Local ALK
1974 D.J. Ogden Retired 1983
1983 D. Livesay Resigned 1984
1984Maughold Head D. Fox Redundant 1984

Attendant
1993 D. Fox Redundant 2004

Retained lighthouse Keeper
2004 D. Fox

http://www.lightkeepersjourney.com/langness.html Langness Lighthouse Fl (2) 30 sec.( fl 1.1, ec 4.6,fl 1.1, ec 23.2) Light Range 12 miles Optic Height 23 metres Tower Height 19 metres Langness from sea-2003 Langness from sea (2003) Langness Tower-20081880 Light established FL 5 sec 1881 Fog signal established 1937 Optical mirror apparatus installed FL (2)30 sec 1987 Fog horn discontinued 14th.December 1994--Tempory light FL (2) 30 sec Status changed to Minor light Range reduced from 21 to 12 miles 27th.September 1995--Permanent light re-established 2 Tideland ML-300 in Bi-form arrangement FL (2) 30 sec 31/03/1996--Automation March 2012 Radio aerials removed Operation of the light is monitored at Northern Lighthouse Board Monitoring Center. Attendant visits on a fortnightly basis carries out system checks and checks physical condition of buildings. From September 2004 the Retained Lighthouse Keeper (Isle of Man) superceded the Attendant and visits on a monthly basis. Technicians visit at least annually to check,modify and update equipment as required. Langness Tower (2008) Aerials for radio connection to Chicken Rock monitoring system and previously to Calf of Man before it was discontinued in 2007 Radio aerials removed 2012 Langness without Radio Aerials (2012) With Calf of Man discontinued and Chicken Rock using satellite phone no longer any need for radio communication to/from Langness . Bi-form Lanterns-2005 Same as Bi-filament Lamp fitted at Point of Ayre (Minor) light Winkie 2002 Two Tideland ML300 Lanterns mounted Bi-form with 10.6 volt 60 watt twin filament bulbs May 2012 Replaced by Pelangi 6 lamp autochanger with 12 volt 50 watt bulbs Langness Pelangi Auto lamp changer 2012 Langness-Old Fog Horn-2004 Photograph taken 2004 Langness--Old Fog Horn-discontinued 1987 Siren 2 blasts of 2 1/2 sec every 60 secs.

Langness Built 1880 10 Holophotal lens with doty burners in Argand lamps 5 groups of two mounted bi-form (ie.one above the other) Fl 5 sec 1937 Holophotal lens replaced by Catoptric mirrors - mercury bath. 55mm Paraffin vapour lamp Character change From FL 5 sec To FL (2) 30 sec Installation by Messers Parsons and Co £561 1996 Automation - Status changed from Major to Minor light Range reduced from 21 to 12 miles Catoptric mirrors - mercury bath removed to Museum of Scottish Lighthouses Replaced by two ML300 Tideland lanterns with 60 watt twin filament bulbs mounted bi-form May 2012 Pelangi 6 lamp autochanger with 12 volt 50 watt bulbs replaced twin filament bulbs Fl (2) 30 sec.( fl 1.1, ec 4.6,fl 1.1, ec 23.2) Batteries Optic 1 Nicad 12v 214ah Monitor 1 Nicad 12v 131 ah Optic 2 Nicad 12v 214ah Monitor 2 Nicad 12v 131 ah Fog signal Two 3½ hp Otto Patent Gas powered engines driving compressors Gas produced from mineral oil using Keiths Patent Process Siren and trumpet of type patented by Messrs. Edmundson of Dublin Siren sounds for 5 seconds, with intervals af 40 seconds New fog signal in 1911 Early 1940's Kelvin twin cylinder engines Siren 2 blasts of 2½ sec every 60 secs. Fog siren discontinued in 1987 Shore link for radio communication to Chicken Rock Light and previously to Calf of Man Light before it was discontinued 2012 Radio communication to Chicken Rock discontinued Chicken Rock communucation now by satellite link

1880 10 Holophotal lens with doty burners in Argand lamps 5 groups of two mounted bi-form (ie.one above the other) Fl 5 sec 1937 Catoptric mirrors (2) mercury bath 55mm pv burner FL(2)30 sec Wind every hour 27/9/95 2 x Tideland ML300 mounted bi-form FL (2) 30sec 1880 Gas works (distilled gas from paraffin) Two 3-1/2 Hp Otto Patent Gas powered engines driving compressors Gas produced from mineral oil using Keiths Patent Process Siren and trumpet of type patented by Messrs. Edmundson of Dublin 1937 Kelvin K2 engines

Operational status

Information about the lighthouse specific

Additional information

The name Langness means Long Point. On 1 January 1868, Trinity House stated that they were aware that application for a light on Langness had arisen from time to time in consequence of wrecks which had taken place there - the arguments used in its favour were that the point projected seaward of the coastline nearly two miles and that rapid tides ran in its vicinity. It was not contended, however, that these tides were irregular or varied in their direction so that they constituted a greater danger to Mariners than in any other parts of the Irish Sea, where tides were known to run with even greater velocity and required proportionate care from navigators. However, one of the chief grounds urged was the inefficiency of the Calf Lights due to their tendency to be enveloped in fog.

In such weather conditions they were therefore insufficient to warn vessels of their proximity to Langness (being 8 miles distant). Representations for a light on Langness were made to Trinity House on 16 February 1869, 10 February 1873, 26 August 1874, and 12 January 1877 - all without success. On 26 August 1874, they were informed also that experiments had been carried out using the red sector of the Chicken Rock Light and that the experiments had proved the red sector to be unsatisfactory. Trinity House replied by stating that even without assistance of the red sector there was no need for a light at Langness.

However, in October 1877, the Commissioners sent to the Board of Trade a statement received from Mr McMeikan, Agent of the vesselwrecked Mariners Society of Castletown, giving details of disasters in the immediate neighbourhood of Langness and his considered opinion "that even the costly and magnificent structure on the Chicken Rock had not been sufficient protection against the dangers of Langness to passing vessels in poor weather". The Board of Trade forwarded the statement to Trinity House who, on 5 December 1877, stated that "the utilization of sound as a resource in navigation has made such substantial progress that it appears to them to be a legitimate question whether that might not be applied at Langness with advantage. If this were done, the necessity for some sort of dwelling and staff of men at a point remote from any spot where occasional labour could be commanded promptly would offer such facilities for the exhibition of the light. If the Board of Trade are wiling to incur the expense of one and distinctive character can be found for it, this Board will not bold sanction to the combination".

Consequently, sanction was requested from Trinity House to the establishment of a Light and Fog Signal on 31 January 1878, and given on 14 February 1878. The Board of Trade sanction was received on 21 February 1878.

Mr Stevenson's proposals were for a tower 50 feet in height, an engine house for the fog signal, dwelling houses for 3 keepers, outhouses including coal cellars, oil cellars, workshop, etc, garden ground amounting to approximately 1½ acres enclosed with stone wall, all at an estimated cost of £38,350. The character of the light was to be flashing white giving a flash every 5 seconds for which it was hoped to be able to utilise the holotrope prepared for the auxiliary light at Chickens. The fog signal was to be a horn or siren giving blasts of 8 seconds' duration with intervals of silence of 22 seconds.

Mr Matheson was appointed Inspector of Works on 18 June 1879 with pay at rate of 10/6d per day with 10/- per week for lodging and travelling expenses.

Tenders were accepted for:
Erection of Lighthouse, Fog Signal
Building and dwelling houses (Messrs Morrison & Son, Edinburgh) £3,979:7:7
Lantern (Messrs Milne & Son) £ 621:10:
Machine (Messrs James Dove & Co)

The lighthouse tower was completed ahead of schedule and the light was first exhibited on Wednesday, December 1880. Many changes have occurred since then.


NLB Langness Langness Lighthouse was established in 1880 and engineered by David and Thomas Stevenson. History On 1 January 1868, Trinity House stated they were aware ‘an application for a light on Langness had arisen from time to time in consequence of wrecks which had taken place there.’ Arguments used in its favour were that the point projected seaward of the coastline nearly two miles and that rapid tides ran in its vicinity. It was not contended, however, that these tides were irregular or varied in their direction so that they constituted a greater danger to Mariners than in any other parts of the Irish Sea. Here tides were known to run with even greater velocity and required proportionate care from navigators. However, one of the main factors in establishing a lighthouse on Langness (the name Langness means Long Point) was the issue that the Calf Lights had a tendency to be enveloped in fog. In those weather conditions the lights were insufficient to warn vessels of their proximity to Langness (being 8 miles distant). Representations for a light on Langness were made to Trinity House on 16 February 1869, 10 February 1873, 26 August 1874, and 12 January 1877 – all without success. On 26 August 1874, they were informed also that experiments had been carried out using the red sector of the Chicken Rock Light and that the experiments had proved the red sector to be unsatisfactory. Trinity House replied by stating that even without assistance of the red sector there was no need for a light at Langness. However, in October 1877, the Commissioners sent to the Board of Trade a statement received from Mr McMeikan, Agent of the Shipwrecked Mariners Society of Castletown, giving details of disasters in the immediate neighbourhood of Langness and his considered opinion “that even the costly and magnificent structure on the Chicken Rock had not been sufficient protection against the dangers of Langness to passing ships in poor weather”. The Board of Trade forwarded the statement to Trinity House who, on 5 December 1877, stated that “the utilization of sound as a resource in navigation has made such substantial progress that it appears to them to be a legitimate question whether that might not be applied at Langness with advantage. If this were done, the necessity for some sort of dwelling and staff of men at a point remote from any spot where occasional labour could be commanded promptly would offer such facilities for the exhibition of the light. If the Board of Trade are wiling to incur the expense of one and distinctive character can be found for it, this Board will not bold sanction to the combination”. Consequently, sanction was requested from Trinity House to the establishment of a Light and Fog Signal on 31 January 1878, and given on 14 February 1878. The Board of Trade sanction was received on 21 February 1878. Mr Stevenson’s proposals were for a tower 50 feet in height, an engine house for the fog signal, dwelling houses for 3 keepers, outhouses including coal cellars, oil cellars, workshop, etc, garden ground amounting to approximately 1½ acres enclosed with stone wall, all at an estimated cost of £38,350. The character of the light was to be flashing white giving a flash every 5 seconds for which it was hoped to be able to utilise the holotrope prepared for the auxiliary light at Chickens. The fog signal was to be a horn or siren giving blasts of 8 seconds’ duration with intervals of silence of 22 seconds. Mr Matheson was appointed Inspector of Works on 18 June 1879 with pay at rate of 10/6d per day with 10/- per week for lodging and travelling expenses. Tenders were accepted for: Erection of Lighthouse, Fog Signal Building and dwelling houses (Messrs Morrison & Son, Edinburgh) Lantern (Messrs Milne & Son) Machine (Messrs James Dove & Co) The lighthouse tower was completed ahead of schedule and the light was first exhibited on Wednesday, December 1880. Many changes have occurred since then. The fog signal was discontinued in 1987 and the lighthouse was automated in 1996.

Langness


A4762

Character: Fl(2) W 30s 23m 12M
(fl. 0.6s - ec. 5.1s, fl. 0.6s - ec. 23.7s)

Langness lighthouse
Lightcharacter of Langness (click to enlarge)
Engineer: David Lillie Stevenson (1815-1886)
: Thomas Stevenson (1818-1887)

Lat, Lon: 54°03.294' N, 004°37.504' W

Established: December 1, 1880
Character: Flashing(2) White every 30 sec.
Range: 12 NM ~ 22.2 km
Elevation: 23 meter above sealevel
Tower: 19 meters, 77 steps to the top
Init. Costs: £ 38,350.
Econ. Costs*: £ 65,530.000.
*) According to: MeasuringWorth.com

Automated: March 31, 1996
Last Keepers: PLK - M.R. Williams
: ALK - A. Marshall
: ALK - G. Dugdale
Fog signal: Siren - 2 blasts in 60 s.
: Discontinued 1987

Status: Operationel
Authority: Northern Lighthouse Board
Remarks: Manx PBR148 - 05/11/1993

Langness Lighthouse
Langness from above

Langness Lighthouse
References:
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